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Frederico Valério

21 November, 2013 to 31 December, 2014

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The Fado Museum presents an exhibition dedicated to the composer Frederico Valério, on the centenary of his birth.

Frederico Valério (1913-1982) is widely renowned as one of the most prolific and talented Portuguese composers. He was a pioneer of modern Fado-Canção, and wrote countless scores that became paramount references in Fado and musical shows’ repertoires. 

His career began in 1932 with the revista “Feira da Alegria”. Soon after he was one of the major composers of his time – along with Raúl Portela, Raúl Ferrão or Frederico de Freitas. “Mãos Sujas” and “Soldado do Fado”, both interpreted by Hermínia Silva in the revista “Chuva de Mulheres” (1937), are a good example of how successful his compositions were.

In the early 1940’s his musical path crossed Amália Rodrigues’ musical path, and he composed some of her major hits - “Ai Mouraria”, “Fado do Ciúme”, “Fado Malhoa”, “Que Deus me perdoe”, among many more.

In 1947 he joined the film industry and his musical scores made a huge success. 

Despite his outstanding success in Portugal, he decided to travel to the United States in 1948. During his period with the famous North-American musical industry, the Portuguese conductor stood out – his “Don’t Say Goodbye” reached the Hit Parade number 1, and later composed two musicals on Broadway: “On with the Show” and “Hit the Trail” (1954). His outstanding international career includes top hits recordings in Brazil, Germany, France and England. 

Back in Portugal and until the very end of his career, he also composed for Simone de Oliveira, Helena Tavares and Cidália Moreira. 

 

 

 
 

Photo: José Frade | Museu do Fado

Photo: José Frade | Museu do Fado

Photo: José Frade | Museu do Fado

Carolina, José Pracana, Dinis Raposo e João Nunes; Photo: José Frade | Museu do Fado

José Pracana e Dinis Raposo; Photo: José Frade | Museu do Fado

Carolina, José Pracana, Dinis Raposo e João Nunes; Photo: José Frade | Museu do Fado